// archives

environment

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Resource management in Asia-Pacific

The RMAP blog at the Research School of Pacific & Asian Studies, ANU.

Savannah Cats (review)

For this Forum, Penelope Marshall led us through a work in progress on the current troubled importation of the Savannah Cat into Australia. This involved stepping back from the controversy to look at how this case depicts tangled webs of failing governance and deliberation, alongside the problematic consequences of humanities project of modernity and ethical dilemmas at the heart of how we think the world should be.

Environmental managers, complexity and effective leadership (review)

On 13 June, Keith Johnston took us into the challenging world of environmental managers in New Zealand. Keith prised open the black box that encapsulates the overwhelming complexity of ‘managing’ the environment as done by people whose cognitive abilities and organisational (social structural) context is of widely varying ability.

The Price of Pre-ecological Policy Inertia: 10,000 hectares of dead Red gums?

This Friday, David Eastburn (Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU) will be leading a discussion on ‘The Price of Pre-ecological Policy Inertia: 10 000 hectares of dead Red gums?’ David will be taking us deep into the conundrums around how the socio-ecological/ economic systems of the Lowbidgee have operated historically and of today, and as drawing from what he has learnt in both employment and study in and around the Lowbidgee.

ecologicalhumanities.org

The Ecological Humanities website based around these people, mostly at the ANU. Would be great if they had a comments page or at least a contact email!

Can environmental managers provide effective leadership in the face of uncertainty and complexity?

Next Friday the 13th of June, Keith Johnston (ANU School of Management, Marketing and International Business) will be leading a discussion on “Can environmental managers provide clear and effective leadership in the face of high levels of uncertainty and complexity?”